The ’80s gave a lot of trends bad names- neon, bottom eyeliner, side ponytails- and blue eyeshadow ranks high on that list. “You have to be careful with placement when working with blue eyeshadow,” makeup artist Meghan Nguy explains. “It can go from runway-inspired to Mimi from the The Drew Carey Show if you overdo it.” Contrary to popular belief, blue is not only easy to use, but can be completely wearable when done right. “Blue, especially of the darker variety, is so close to something familiar, like black or brown, so someone wouldn’t immediately notice it,” says Nguy. “It would be more of a ‘You look great! What did you do differently?’”

For everyday inspiration, Nguy looked to Marc Jacobs spring/summer ’16 take on the trend- the ultimate party-girl grunge. Like most runway looks, a direct translation to everyday life would be severe, but a toned-down version is the perfect toe-dipper into the blue eyeshadow realm.

Step One

Prep the eyes with a rust-brown cream shadow as the base. Only apply one swipe and blend out with your fingers to achieve a soft wash of color all over the lid.

Step Two

For a truer blue like the one used in the show, line the upper lash line using the Bright Blue shade. Since a cream will automatically go on messy, embrace the rougher application and lightly smudge outward and upward.

Step Three

If you're looking for something more subdued, applying a navy eyeliner roughly along line the lash line will give you a subtle, but still striking effect.

Step Four

To mimic the spidery lash effect at Marc Jacobs without scaring off friends and coworkers, layer mascara slowly, letting each coat dry completely before adding more product.

Step Five

Finish off the look by concealing any dark circles or blemishes while keeping the rest of the face neutral, then apply balm with a hint of pink to lips and the tops of cheekbones for a sheer flush of color.

A more traditional blue smokey eye, right this way. More of a lip person? Read up on the dark lip revival.

Credits

Artwork
Blair Breitenstein